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Comment by Byron Dale on March 12, 2017 at 11:46am

Then need to predict protect and preserve our economy from being in perpetual debt, and our freedom from the bankers own money system is to have the government create the money and spend it into circulation for the benefit of everyone and not just the super-rich, like is done now when the banks create all the money and I loaded into circulation as interest-bearing loans. 

The best way and the most sensible way to upgrade and rebuild the roads, reduce our debt to have the money to pay for the upgrading transportation system is to move to solar roads.  This concept may be new to many people, solar roads are roads made out of glass which is made of sand.  The road will also be like solar panels and will produce electricity.  Once our roads are built that way we will have all the electricity for the whole nation without any cost to the individual user. 

Solar electricity would reduce the effect of gasoline and diesel fuel is needs to power cars and trucks.  Solar roads lighted by solar electricity would prove the safety of roads on dark nights and in storms.  Solar roads could provide free electricity to rest stops and provide for free electricity for recharging battery’s in vehicles. 

Countless new jobs would be created to employ the flood of designers and engineers manufactures and workers needed for all aspects of solar power solar panels lights battery storage systems.

Fuel and all other taxes now collected for the building and maintenance of all roads bridges needs would no longer be needed because these things would all be paid for by the government created the money and spending it into circulation.  Instead of the banks created the new money an loaning into circulation as interest-bearing debt.

Comment by Byron Dale on March 12, 2017 at 9:19am

Hi Chuck thanks for your reply. I found it interesting.  However, you did not cite any laws just court opinions.  As I understand it under our Constitution only legislators can legislate law not the court system. They can only give you their opinions.  I understand in our society the judges and almost everybody else believe that everything that comes out of the mouth of judges is the law and the judges have the right and the power to enforce whatever they say.  However I believe that is totally unconstitutional.  I sent the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis two of their notes that said they would pay me dollars on demand and requested payment in dollars that the owed me. I also informed them that I didn't know what a dollar was so please send me the law that stated what a dollar was.  They refused to do so so I sued them in small claims court. That court would not address issues just dismissed it was prejudiced. So I just fielded up the ladder. The case ended in the 8th federal court of appeals. That court declarative Federal Reserve notes with money of the country and dismissed my case saying I had allowed claim for which no relief was available. If one really studies our monetary system you will find that their is no way Federal Reserve notes and coins can get into circulation unless someone goes to a bank buys them with bank credit created and loaned into circulation by a bank. 

Comment by Chuck Reames on March 12, 2017 at 7:05am

The following will show how the legal definition of "Dollar" has changed over the years. It will also indicate the the paper we carry in our pockets cannot be called dollars.

"Definitions of "Dollar"

Bouvier's Law Dictionary, 1856 Edition
DOLLAR, money. A silver coin of the United States of the value of one hundred cents,
or tenth part of an eagle.
2. It weighs four hundred and twelve and a half grains. Of one thousand parts, nine
hundred are of pure silver and one hundred of alloy. Act of January 18, 1837, ss. 8 & 9, 4
Sharsw. Cont. of Story's L. U. S. 2523, 4; Wright, R. 162.
3. In all computations at the custom-house, the specie dollar of Sweden and Norway shall
be estimated at one hundred and six cents. The specie dollar of Denmark, at one hundred
and five cents. Act of May 22, 1846.
CENT, money. A copper coin of the United States of the value of ten mills; ten of them
are equal to a dime, and one hundred, to one dollar. Each cent is required to contain one
hundred and sixty-eight grains. Act of January 18th, 1837, 4 Sharsw. cont. of Story',s L.
U. S. 2524.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition (1891)
DOLLAR. The unit employed in the United States in calculating money values. It is
coined both in gold and silver, and is of the value of one hundred cents.

CENT. A coin of the United States, the least in value of those now minted. It is the
hundredth part of a dollar. Its weight is 72 gr., and it is composed of copper and nickel in
the ratio of 88 to 12.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 3rd Edition (1933)
DOLLAR. The unit employed in the United States in calculating money values. It is
coined both in gold and silver, and is of the value of one hundred cents. Thompson v.
State, 90 Rex. Cr. R. 125, 234 S. W. 406, 408.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition (1951)
DOLLAR. The unit employed in the United States in calculating money values. It is
coined both in gold and silver, and is of the value of one hundred cents. People v. Alba
46 Cal.App.2d 859, 117 P.2d 63. Money or currency issued by lawful authority and
intended to pass and circulated as such. Neufield v. United States, 118 f,2d 375, 387, 73
App.D.C. 174. The dollar of nine-tenths fine consisting of the weight determined under
the 31 U.S.C.A. § 321, shall be the standard unit of value, and all forms of money issued
or coined shall be maintained at a parity of value with this standard. 31 U.S.C.A. § 314.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition Revised (1957)
DOLLAR. The unit employed in the United States in calculating money values. It is of
the value of 100 cents. People v. Alba, 46 Cal.App.2d 859, 117 P.2d 63. Money or
currency issued by lawful authority and intended to pass and circulated as such. Neufield
v. United States, 118 f, 2d 375, 387, 73 App.D.C. 174.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition (1968)
Dollar. The money unit employed in the United States of the value of one hundred cents,
or any combination of coins totalling one hundred cents.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 6th Edition (1979)
Dollar. The money unit employed in the United States of the value of one hundred cents,
or any combination of coins totalling one hundred cents.

Cent. A coin of the United States, the least in value of those now minted. It is the
hundredth part of a dollar.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 7
(No definition for "dollar" or "cent" found)

Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition (1930 & 1948)
Dollar (dol'ar). " There is no ambiguity about the word 'dollar'." If any word has a
settled meaning at law, and in the courts, it is this. It can only mean the legal currency of
the United States, not dollars vested in lands. A dollar is the volume of money, and is by
law made a money unit value of the value of one hundred cents. See State v. Downs, 148
Ind. 324, 327.

Ballentines Law Dictionary, 3rd
Edition (1969)
dollar. The legal currency of the United States; State v Downs, 148 Ind 324, 327; the
unit of money consisting of one hundred cents. The aggregate of specific coins which
add up to one dollar. 36 Am J1st Money § 8. In the absence of qualifying words, it cannot mean promissory notes, bonds, or other evidences of debt. 36 AM J1 Money § 8


Black's Law, Second Pocket Edition (1996)
Federal Reserve Note
federal reserve note. The paper currency in circulation in the United States. The notes
are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks, are effectively non-interest-bearing
promissory notes payable to bearer on demand, and are issued in denominations of $1,
$5, $10, $20, $50, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000. (Emphasis Added)

American Jurisprudence, Volume 36, § 8
[T]he term "dollar" means money, since it is the unit of money in this country, and in the
absence of qualifying words, it cannot mean promissory notes or bonds or other
evidences of debt. The term also refers to specific coins of the value of one dollar. (27
Ohio Jur pp. 125, 126, § 3), (United States v. Van Auken, 96 US 366, 24 L ed 852)

Comment by Byron Dale on March 11, 2017 at 12:41pm

The question was, what is a dollar? 

The 1792 coinage act dates dollars or units - each to be the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain 371 grains and 4/16 parts of a grain of pure,  or 416 grains of standard silver. That is the only law that I have found which defines the dollar. However, people in government will say that will no longer applies. I have not been able to find anything where that law was repealed or amended. I I have challenged what the definition of a dollar is in courts.  They simply refuse to address the issue. They will not and cannot tell me what the definition of a dollar is.  In today world the dollar is just a number written doubted bank ledger  or coins and currency.  

Keith I am very disappointed and saddened that you would put such trash as the above on the pages of the Constitution club. Very little of it is actually based on fact.  most of it is just trash the banking system wants to make you believe is true.

Comment by Kirk Beck on March 9, 2017 at 9:54am

This is a very short and insightful critique of our present state of confusion on what is a dollar.

Comment by Charles Wayne Cox on March 9, 2017 at 8:23am

See Greg Hunter's interview with Hugo Salinas-Price on his idea for silver...interesting concept.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7PBYjhHD9Dg

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